Why Millennials Need to Be Thinking About Facilities Management

As a millennial entering the workforce, you have a lot of new and exciting career options to choose from. Many of these traditional occupations are incredibly competitive and can be difficult to get into. Luckily, there exists a relatively unknown career field that’s perfectly suited for millennials with a unique appreciation for workplace culture and the technology that goes with it.

Facilities management involves everything to do with the daily operations of a workspace and the people who work there. The way we work and what we value in our work environments is constantly changing, which is why facilities management may be the perfect career path for the millennial worker. Here are a few more reasons why millennials in particular should consider a career in this changing industry.

A facilities manager holds real value in a changing workforce

Our work environments are rapidly changing. The old-school cubicle is dead and in its place we have remote offices, open offices, hotdesking and collaborative workspaces. This shift in workplace culture has largely been driven by the values of today’s entrepreneurs.

While all of these changes in company structure, goals and values are important, work still needs to get done. In order to successfully enable workers, employees and business owners to be productive, the modern office now needs to cater to a variety of workplace needs.

This is where the facilities manager comes in. This field demands a diverse thinker who understands the needs of everyone in the office and who is able to turn a workplace into a comfortable space that promotes productivity. Today’s entrepreneurs value a comfortable and friendly working environment and it’s the goal of a facilities manager to ensure this takes place.

The facilities management space is relatively unknown

Just one percent of millennials think they’re going to land a career in the facilities management field. This greatly reduces the amount of competition you'll face and gives you more freedom to define your own career path.

Since most people who work in facilities management are well into their careers, this will create a flood of opportunities when these older workers leave the workforce. It also makes it much easier to find a great mentor who’s willing to impart their wisdom to you. By taking what they give you and applying it to a new and vibrant work environment, you can set yourself up for success.

Facilities management allows for creativity and innovation

As the baby boomer generation is primed to retire, it’s the millennials who are going to redefine the future of the workforce. The modern office is evolving and you can be at the forefront of emerging trends like defining company culture, maximizing worker happiness, reducing workplace stress and creating the office of the future.

With a lot of companies coming to terms with the necessity of a workplace that puts employee values and contributions first, the job opportunities will only continue to grow. The workers of today demand social awareness, work-life balance and personal growth. As a millennial who has these same values, you’ll be able to more easily integrate these priorities into the company you work for.

Facilities management demands integrated technology

You’ve grown up with technology. You have an understanding of how technology can be used for greater productivity and enhanced collaboration. Because of this, you're perfectly positioned to integrate these tools in a work environment. In a workplace, these technologies can play a role in increasing productivity and worker happiness. This knowledge will come in handy now and in the future as technology plays an even bigger role in our lives and work days.

If you’re looking for a rewarding career that’s growing in importance within the modern workplace, consider a career in facilities management. It’s not your normal desk job—in fact, facilities managers are striving to overhaul the entire industry, both in its functions and its values.

Photos: Eugenio Marongiu / Shutterstock, Unsplash, CSLD / Shutterstock, Jeffrey Betts, Negativespace