5 Magazines to Keep Your Waiting Room Interesting

Entertain Office Guests With Good Reading Material

waiting room magazinesMagazines are a small but significant detail that can improve a well-designed waiting room. The combination of People and Time and Forbes are a familiar sight, no matter what sort of building you’re in. But for your company’s waiting room(s), why not suggest breaking the mold and stocking something a little different, in addition to the magazines you know your visitors will find interesting? The following magazines are just a few examples of what you could offer to add variety to your current sock of reading material.

mental_floss

mental_floss educates readers on the things they’ve heard of, and enlightens them on the things that they haven’t. From art and literature to scientific theories, the magazine spans an entire topic wheel. Each issue is filled with trivia that can make good fodder for a cocktail party. Recent issues, for example, have included topics like “The Secret Lives of Sumo Wrestlers” and answers to big questions like, “Who gets rich from ‘Happy Birthday?’” and “Why can’t I wear white after Labor Day?”

Mother Jones

If an office visitor is super early for a meeting, they’ll find several long-form investigative stories to dive into in Mother Jones. With a focus on social justice, this non-profit magazine digs up information that you’re unlikely to read anywhere else. Past stories have profiled soldiers’ families who have developed PTSD and a farmer in the Northeast who works to revive rare breeds of apples. Politically, the magazine leans unabashedly left. But regardless of your own stance, there’s plenty of compelling material to read.

Fortune

Fortune covers the people who are changing the business world: people like PayPal co-founder and Tesla Motor CEO Elon Musk and Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman. Columnists also share their insight on trends that are shaping business—some recent examples being “Your next CEO is probably a Gen Xer” and “Why company change programs fail.” For the business savvy, Fortune’s a good way to keep track of the field at large; for the less business-savvy, it’s a look into the lives of people behind some of the products and services they use every day.

Outside Magazine

Outside may sound a little too niche to appeal to a broad audience. Like the name suggests, Outside presents stories on the environment, adventure, people involved in the great outdoors and travel. But its stories are readable and interesting, even if the sections on gear don’t catch your eye. The most recent issue discussed the story of a man who lied his way into receiving $7 million from the Air Force to train its staff.

Modern Cat/Modern Dog

Do you know how to interpret a cat’s body language? Or how you should deal with bullies at the dog park? Modern Cat and Modern Dog can answer those questions. These two magazines shine the light on these popular pets and the best ways to take care of them. Even if your guests aren’t pet owners, though, either of these two magazines can be a nice break from reading about the world of the two-legged.

Your waiting room can be that small but significant touch that impresses your company’s visitors. Try offering some of the more usual reading options in addition to something a little more unusual to give them a variety to choose from.

 

photo credit: Duncan Rawlinson - @thelastminute - Duncan.co via photopin cc

 

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